addiction

Why are video games addictive?

29Oct
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We need to Disconnect to really Connect

25Sep
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Can you go back to a dumbphone?

09Sep
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Why teaching kids coding is a waste of time and money

02Sep
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Should kids be learning on screens?

27Aug
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An alternative to screens in the car that we can all enjoy

08Aug
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Smart Phones are making us dumb!

05Aug
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Teens are addicted to smart phones

05Aug
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Smartphones at school

09Dec
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October 29, 2019
Dr Mark Williams Neuroscience Professor Author Speaker Facilitator

Why are video games addictive?

Quite simply they are designed to be addictive. There are literally millions of different games available. Video game designers have to make their game popular. Popularity occurs when players return to play on a regular basis. Designers achieve this by making their game challenging enough that very few people get to the finish. They also ensuring that there are incentives or wins along the way. We call this intermittent reinforcement. It fires up the pleasure areas of our brains and is a great way to ensure a person wants to return. This is the same type of reinforcement that makes gambling so addictive.
September 25, 2019
Dr Mark Williams Neuroscience Professor Author Speaker Facilitator

We need to Disconnect to really Connect

Have you ever thought what it says when you place a phone down on a table or desk? It clearly says, “I’m not 100% at this meeting, gathering, dinner, lunch …… ".
September 9, 2019
Dr Mark Williams Neuroscience Professor Author Speaker Facilitator

Can you go back to a dumbphone?

Why should you consider switching to a dumbphone. You will have more time, be more efficient and more productive. I would recommend it because you will be less stressed, happier and more attentive to those around you.
August 5, 2019
Dr Mark Williams Neuroscience Professor Author Speaker Facilitator

Teens are addicted to smart phones

There is now a phenomenon called 'Phantom Vibration Syndrome'. It occurs when someone regularly has their phone set to vibrate. They feel phantom vibrations on their leg - even when their phone is not present. Up to 90% of US University students experience these phantom vibrations.
December 9, 2019
Dr Mark Williams Neuroscience Professor Author Speaker Facilitator

Smartphones at school

Many private schools in NSW are now banning smartphones during school hours and all the feedback I have heard is extremely positive. Schools should be about learning and anything that hinders learning should be restricted.